Shakespeare & Company

Shakespeare & Company

To fully appreciate the backstory of the fabled Shakespeare & Company bookstore, we must rewind to 1919, when a young female entrepreneur, bookseller and publisher named Sylvia Beach opened a bookshop in St. Germain-des-Prés.

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Jane Austen Centre

Jane Austen Centre

Jane Austen lived in Bath for five years and set two novels in the pretty Georgian city, Northanger Abbey & Persuasion. Bath was an important chapter in her life and shaped her life irrevocably, almost ruining her writing career. It was noisy, chaotic, and stifled her capacity to write. Here, she also came to terms with the true quandary of being an unwed woman in Regency England without means to support herself.

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State Library of Victoria

State Library of Victoria

The steps of the classical forecourt were dotted with people waiting for the doors to open. Most hurried inside to find a quiet corner and others just marvelled at the beauty and grandeur of the architecture.

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John Sandoe Books

John Sandoe Books

Tucked away just off the King's Road in Chelsea is a wonderful little bookshop, John Sandoe Books. The three-story shop remains in the same building where Sandoe first set up shop, now spanning three side by side stores acquired over fifty years.

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Leakey’s Bookshop

Leakey’s Bookshop

Inverness is the most northerly city in Britain and the capital of the Scottish Highlands. Here, nestled on the banks of the Ness, you'll find the iconic Leakey's Bookshop, a former Gaelic church filled floor to ceiling with stacks of books.

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Jane Austen’s House Museum

Jane Austen’s House Museum

Chawton Cottage in Hampshire, now the Jane Austen House Museum, may be the most prominent Jane Austen site in the world, yet the symbolic value of this house goes beyond bricks and mortar. This modest cottage changed the course of history.

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Rijksmuseum Library

Rijksmuseum Library

Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum is home to over 8,000 priceless artworks, including masterpieces by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Hals and Steen... but did you know about the secret library? There is a magnificent art history library that is easy to overlook.

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Armchair Books

Armchair Books

It's really no surprise that Edinburgh is teeming with top-notch literary haunts - from exceptional libraries, quirky independent bookshops, and illustrious literary history, the Scottish capital is a wonderland for bibliophiles.

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Word on the Water

Word on the Water

A once-wandering 1920's barge has taken up residence on London's Granary Square, yet this is no ordinary passenger barge, it's a floating bookshop called Word on the Water - a treasure trove of books.

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State Library of South Australia

State Library of South Australia

Who knew Adelaide was hiding such a stunning library? I accidentally stumbled upon it while perusing a "Most Beautiful Libraries" article and the State Library of South Australia was there on the list!

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The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

In this modern age, receiving anything by post is a rare occurrence, so you can imagine how overjoyed I was to find an invitation to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society movie premiere in my letterbox. As I ripped open the envelope I was immediately intrigued by the peculiar title and curious to find out what a potato peel pie has to do with a literary society, and what the heck is a potato peel pie? Despite the funny title, this was a gorgeous film with a huge heart. 

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Be Persuaded Regency Exhibition

Be Persuaded Regency Exhibition

To mark the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, the Dressing Australia - Museum of Costume is presenting a rare and wonderful exhibition bringing the era of Jane Austen to life, with a showcase of original items of the time. Be Persuaded features fashion, accessories and ephemera from the 18th century, rarely on display outside of major museums.

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Love and Friendship Review

Love and Friendship Review

I have found the perfect Sunday afternoon film, Love and Friendship, the comical adaptation of the novella, Lady Susan. Posters for the film were plastered all over the tube on my last trip to London and as soon as I got home to Australia I beelined for the cinema. Lady Susan is one of the few works of Jane Austen that I have never actually read, so it was a beautiful treat to enter the cinema completely unsure of what to expect. Given that Lady Susan is not a particularly well known work, I was anticipating Love and Friendship to be quite dull.

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Mr Holmes Review

Mr Holmes Review

I first became acquainted with eccentric consulting detective, Sherlock Holmes, when I enrolled in a Victorian Literary Culture class at university. From the very first case, A Study in Scarlet, I was immediately drawn into the murky crime-ridden streets of London, and within two years I had inhaled every single Sherlock Holmes story ever written. The Victorian era (1837 – 1901) has become synonymous with progression, innovation, and rapid social change – and the literary scene was much the same. 

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Far from the Madding Crowd Review

Far from the Madding Crowd Review

Yesterday I saw the new film adaptation of the classic novel by Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd. Let’s be honest, the book is always better than the film, but I actually love watching my favourite books come to life on the big screen. Film adaptations of books are notoriously disappointing because when we read the novel plays like a movie in our own head, we get to cast all of the characters and give depth and detail to every word, so it’s not entirely surprising that we often walk out of the cinema feeling frustrated with the casting or unexpected changes and omissions.

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The Turn of the Screw

The Turn of the Screw

The Turn of the Screw is perhaps the most famous ghost story ever written. To this day there are elements of this creepy tale woven into the framework of the horror genre. Gothic literature is my obsession, I love suspense, intrigue, and mystery. The Turn of the Screw features a big haunted house, an isolated woman, beautiful yet creepy children, menacing ghosts and unexplained occurrences that will leave you both perplexed and infuriated.

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Suffragette Review

Suffragette Review

Set in 1912, Suffragette unfolds the story of Maud Watts, a young wife and mother unintentionally swept up in the women’s suffrage movement. The film is largely work of fiction blended with real historical events and figures to recreate the turbulent fight for the female vote in Great Britain. Suffragette offers a snapshot of London prior to the outbreak of the First World War when the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) actively pursued the right to vote through acts of civil disobedience, militancy and insurgency. 

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