Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is the literary heroine we never knew we needed. She rarely strays from routine – from her lacklustre job as a finance clerk, scheduled Wednesday night chats with Mummy, and an enduring love of Tesco – she has things under control.

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Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

Emily Brontë’s masterpiece, Wuthering Heights, has been dividing audiences for nearly two centuries. Readers will either hate this book with the fire of a thousand suns or love it, there is no middle ground. Wuthering Heights is an estate on the Yorkshire Moors, a bleak and unwelcoming home, haunted by ghosts of the past. A housekeeper, Nelly Dean, tells a tale of the family who lived there before, recounting the chain of events that lead back to the present day where a brooding tyrant is now master of the house.

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My Reading List

My Reading List

When I see a beautiful edition of a classic novel that I want to add to my collection, I can’t help myself. The problem is that I am prone to buying doubles, triples, or quadruples of my favourite novels. Please help me, I have six copies of Pride and Prejudice! As a potential solution to curb my little book problem, I have set myself a fairly long list of classic novels that I want to read over the next couple of years.

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A Literary Love Letter

A Literary Love Letter

There are stories to tell in every aspect of daily life, even the simplest tasks have a narrative. I am endlessly fascinated by the human psyche and the way that our minds control our entire world. Reading provides a socially acceptable outlet to try on all sorts of lives and minds. As children, we are taught that magic only exists in fairytales, but reading transports us to the past and the future, mythical worlds, far away galaxies, exotic lands, the apocalypse, and beyond. So who can really say that books are not magical objects?

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A Room of One’s Own, by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One’s Own, by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf’s thought provoking thesis had such a profound impact upon me the first time I laid my eyes upon it. What could I possibly say about this remarkable piece of work without merely copying and pasting all of the paragraphs I love and gushing about their brilliance? Which I have done below anyway.

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The Dressmaker Costume Exhibition, Melbourne

The Dressmaker Costume Exhibition, Melbourne

Ripponlea House and Gardens in Elsternwick are one of Melbourne’s best kept secrets and a place that is very dear to my heart. A grand estate built in 1868 as a luxury family home, which remained so for over a century until the house was passed on to the National Trust of Australia in 1972.

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The Celestine Prophecy, by James Redfield

The Celestine Prophecy, by James Redfield

Book snobs are an inevitable part of the literary community, but instead of scoffing at the choices of other readers, how about we celebrate all books that inspire people to read. Have you noticed that popular books have a habit of becoming critically unpopular once they garner too much attention? The hysteria of the Twilight series swept up even the most unlikely of bookworms? From literary beginnings came the mania of the film series, the exponential growth of teen vampire fiction, and then the backlash. Within a couple of years, Twilight went from undead to dead. 

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The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw is perhaps the most famous ghost story ever written. To this day there are elements of this creepy tale woven into the framework of the horror genre. Gothic literature is my obsession, I love the suspense, intrigue, and mystery. The Turn of the Screw features a big haunted house, an isolated woman, beautiful yet creepy children, menacing ghosts and unexplained occurrences that leave you both perplexed and infuriated. This novella was published in 1898 at the very end of the Victorian era, yet the story itself is quite different to other stories produced at this time.

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